Zafron Restaurant
Zafron Restaurant
236 Johnson Ferry Rd NE
Sandy SpringsGA 30328
 (404) 255-7402

Edible Flowers, Gourmet Cuisine and You at Zafron Restaurant

Edible Flowers, Gourmet Cuisine and You at Zafron Restaurant

Persian food heaven starts at Zafron. Named after a flower known as the crocus from Asia—the stamen where pollen is produced is harvested once a year after being sun dried. Called saffron as a spice, its yellow and orange color excites the eyes and tickles the palate. Taking 80,000 crocus flowers to make 1 pound makes saffron one of the most expensive spices on the market.

It Starts with the Chef

Working with his grandfather in Persia, Peter Teimori learned his trade as a baker and chef French style. Taking the family tradition to a whole new level, he became a master pastry chef and bread maker. Performing a corporate job at Ritz-Carlton Hotels, he learned to develop pastry standards. To top it off, he was also an instructor at the California Culinary Academy. All of this gave him the skills and insight for the Zafron position. To sweeten the deal at Zafron, he has even been developing training programs to push Zafron to national chain status. Most of all, it is the delectable Persian delights on the menu that get customers coming back on a regular basis.

What’s For Lunch?

Undergoing a periodical renovation and revamp from building to menu gives new perspective or twists on favorite items, and a well trained kitchen staff creates visually appealing meals as well as meals that excite the palatve—and satisfy the hunger. Take the Mirza Ghasemi; its sun-dried blend of roasted eggplant, garlic, and tomatoes laced with smoky goodness sets the tone for the evening. Or the Persian Hummus Pureed Fava Beans. Add in sesame tahini, EVOO, garlic, and lemon and you have exotic food that fulfills and satisfies. The hummus is made with delicious and nutritious chick peas, and the dish has been around at least 1,000 years. Rumor has it that it was served to Saladin, the first sultan and warrior against European Crusaders. The tahini portion relates to sesame seeds, while EVOO refers to extra virgin olive oil.

Persian Hummus

Entrées include such dishes as Koobideh Kabob, Chenjeh Kabob, and Saffron Chicken Kabob. Koobideh means minced meat. Meat is beaten until tender, then put on a skewer. Kabob means "put on a fire to cook"—so, a tasty treat conveniently put on a stick for easy eating or traveling. Chenjeh is lamb or beef pieces put on the skewers. Of course, the chicken kabob comes flavored with crocus flower powder known as saffron. Dessert ranges from decadent cakes to mousse to ice cream.

The Conclusion:

Whatever your choice, the food will be intriguing and flavor-filled, so prepare to enjoy. The new décor emphasizes the Persian feel with clean cut lines in tables and chairs. Candles, metal lace work, and diamond motifs make you expect the sultan for lunch. Better yet, invite a friend or significant other for lunch. Stop by and see what Chef Peter Teimori is cooking up today!